Show cart returners respect; if you live outside city, you're on your own — Letters to the Editor, June 8, 2019

Show cart returners respect; if you live outside city, you're on your own — Letters to the Editor, June 8, 2019

Treat them as if they were your own children out there

If you live outside city limits, you’re on your own

Early Wednesday as I was leaving home, I saw a man with a bicycle and a small yellow trailer at Highway 101 and Grand Avenue (south of the bridge) with paper strewn everywhere. When I circled back he was gone but I picked up a large pile of opened mail and a package.

I took it to the Florence Police Department and was told to call the Lane County Sheriff’s Office because I found the mail outside of the city limits — even though a lot of the mail had Florence addresses.

I wasn’t given an opportunity to give a statement, description or talk to a police officer. It was suggested I take it to the post office, which I did.

It’s not the first time I encountered this problem; even though your address is Florence, you work there, own a business there, shop and donate and support Florence events, have kids and grandkids who go to school there, you can’t get help from local police if you live outside the city limits.

If you do, better keep your eyes open and learn to protect yourself because city police can’t.

—Larry Bouchet

Florence

Show grocery store cart returners some respect

I have witnessed a troubling situation several times in the parking lot of local grocery stores. It concerns young men and women who retrieve shopping carts for the store. These young people are out there on a daily basis in the heat, cold, rain and even snow, running after carts and trying to secure them before they hit a vehicle. This is especially true at Fred Meyer.

Most of the time, they are running after carts left by people too lazy to return them to the corrals available throughout the parking lot. I have also seen shoppers lunge carts towards workers when they aren’t looking, and also watched drivers speed through the lot and nearly hit workers.

I even saw one man flick a cigarette out his truck window at a worker.

They deserve as much respect as any other employee. I talk with them quite often and they are well-mannered and polite.

In order to keep them, as well as other shoppers, safeer, speed signs and/or some speed bumps should be installed to slow traffic.

If you haven’t done their job or walked in their shoes, don’t judge them — treat them as if they were your own children out there.

—SueEllen Smith

Florence  

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